Khan Medical Practice - Services

Services

Our practice offers general medical services and a wide range of clinics available to patients from Chronic Disease Management to heath and life style advice. Our specialist anticoagulation clinic is open to any NHS patient with our area, if you are not our patient and would like to use this clinic please ask your GP to refer you to us. All services can be accessed via reception

Chronic disease management

A chronic medical condition is one that has been (or is likely to be) present for six months or longer, for example, Asthma, COPD, Cancer, Heart disease, Diabetes, Arthritis and Renal diseases. These conditions require a structured approach and the doctor will work with you to plan and coordinate the management and treatment of complex conditions requiring ongoing care from the practice clinical team and community/multidisciplinary care teams. Your doctor will determine whether a plan is appropriate for you.

Asthma

For patients with Asthma over the age of 3 Our nurse will assess your level of Asthma symptoms, give you information about Asthma and ensure you are taking your medication correctly. This will help reduce hospital admissions due to exacerbation. If you are having problems the nurse will refer you to your GP. Depending on the severity of your condition you should be seen every 3, 6 or 12 months, if you have not been to the Asthma clinic in 12 months please book an appointment at our reception. You will need to bring your inhalers, peak flow meter and spacer device along with your treatment card to your appointment. Normally this would include a review of:

  • Patient and family history
  • Height
  • Weight
  • Body Mass Index
  • Peak Flow
  • Medication
  • Inhaler technique

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

For patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Our nurse will assess your level of symptoms, give you information about COPD and ensure you are taking your medication correctly.This will help reduce hospital admissions due to exacerbation. If you are having problems the nurse will refer you to your GP. Depending on the severity of your condition you should be seen every 3, 6 or 12 months, if you have not been to the COPD clinic in 12 months please book an appointment at our reception. You will need to bring your inhalers, peak flow meter and spacer device along with your treatment card to your appointment. Normally this would include a review of:

  • Patient and family history
  • Height
  • Weight
  • Body Mass Index
  • Spirometry
  • Medication
  • Inhaler technique

Diabetes

Patients with Diabetes over the age of 15 A blood and urine sample need to be taken one week before your appointment, so that the results are received in time for clinic. Appointments and sample bottles can be obtained from reception. If you have not been to the Diabetic clinic in the last 6 » 12 months please book an appointment at the reception desk. You will need to bring in your blood monitor and test strips so that we can check the calibration and usage are correct. Normally this would include a review of:

  • Blood pressure
  • Blood Sugar
  • Weight
  • Feet
  • Eyes (we may refer you for retinopathy screening)
  • Medication
  • Blood and Urine tests

Hypertension

The Hypertension clinic deals with the treatment and management of high blood pressure. If your blood pressure is very difficult to control your GP may suggest referral to the high blood pressure clinic (the hypertension clinic) but it is important to remember that most people with high blood pressure can be managed effectively by their GP. Normally this would include a review of:

  • Blood pressure
  • Medication
  • Blood and Urine tests

Well Man

All male patients over the age of 20 You can make an appointment either at the reception desk or by telephone. Normally this would include a review of:

  • Patient and family history
  • Blood pressure
  • Weight Advice
  • Height
  • Body Mass Index
  • Peak flow
  • Diet
  • Exercise
  • Smoking Advice
  • Alcohol consumption
  • Tetanus Status
  • Urine and blood tests
  • Cholesterol
  • ECG's if necessary

Well Woman

All female patients over the age of 20 You can make an appointment either at the reception desk or by telephone. Normally this would include a review of:

  • Patient and family history
  • Blood pressure
  • Weight Advice
  • Height
  • Body Mass Index
  • Peak flow
  • Diet
  • Exercise
  • Smoking Advice
  • Alcohol consumption
  • Tetanus Status
  • Urine and blood tests
  • Cholesterol
  • ECG's if necessary
  • Where appropriate a smear will be offered

ECG

ECG (electrocardiogram) is a test that measures the electrical activity of the heart. The heart is a muscular organ that beats in rhythm to pump the blood through the body. The signals that make the heart's muscle fibres contract come from the sinoatrial node, which is the natural pacemaker of the heart. In an ECG test, the electrical impulses made while the heart is beating are recorded and usually shown on a piece of paper. This is known as an electrocardiogram or ECG for short, and records any problems with the heart's rhythm, and the conduction of the heart beat through the heart which may be affected by underlying heart disease. How is an ECG performed? * Up to 12 self-adhesive electrodes will be attached to select locations of the skin on the arms, legs and chest. Areas such as the chest where the electrodes will be placed may need to be shaved. First, the skin is cleaned. The test is completely painless and takes less than a minute to perform once the leads are in position. After the test, the electrodes are removed. * The doctor will review the paper print-out of the ECG.

Spirometry

A spirometer is a device which measures the amount of air that you can blow out. There are various spirometer devices made by different companies, but they all measure the same thing. They all have a mouthpiece that you use to blow into the device. A doctor or nurse may ask you to blow into a spirometer ('spirometry') if you have chest or lung symptoms. How is it done? You breathe in fully and then seal your lips around the mouthpiece of the spirometer. You then blow out as fast and as far as you can until your lungs are completely empty. This can take several seconds. You may also be asked to breathe in fully and then breathe out slowly as far as you can. A clip may be put onto your nose to make sure that no air escapes from your nose. The above routine may be done two or three times to check that the readings are much the same each time you blow into the machine. What does the spirometer measure? The most common measurements used are: * FEV1 - Forced Expiratory Volume in one second. This is the amount of air you can blow out within one second. With normal lungs and airways you can normally blow out most of the air from your lungs within one second. * FVC - Forced Vital Capacity. The total amount of air that you blow out in one breath. * FEV1 divided by FVC (FEV1/FVC). Of the total amount of air that you can blow out in one breath, this is the proportion that you can blow out in one second.

Peak Flow

Peak flow is a measure of how fast you can blow air out of your lungs. In so doing, it measures how wide your airways in your lungs are. When you visit the surgery, your peak flow reading may be taken for two reasons:

  1. To find out if you have asthma.
  2. To assess the state of your asthma if you have had it for some time.

For people with asthma, this simple test shows how well their asthma is being controlled. Peak flow readings vary, according to sex, age and height. In addition, they vary throughout the day. The morning reading is often lower than that of the evening. It is the difference between these two readings that is important for the doctor to see in assessing how well your asthma is controlled.

Blood Pressure

It is important that you attend your GP surgery at least once every 5 years to have your blood pressure checked, although an annual check up is preferable. If your blood pressure is found to be higher than the recommended level (140/90) then your GP may ask you to make some lifestyle changes that will help to reduce your blood pressure. They may also start you on some medicines to help control your blood pressure. If your blood pressure is very difficult to control your GP may suggest referral to the high blood pressure clinic (the hypertension clinic) but it is important to remember that most people with high blood pressure can be managed effectively by their GP.

Near Patient testing

For patients on controlled drugs, this clinic offers regular blood testing at the surgery removing the need to go to the hospital.

Anticoagulant clinic

For patients taking oral anticoagulants, this clinic is open to any patient in the local area. If you are not our patient and wish to use our clinic please ask your GP to refer you

Previously only available at hospital this clinic offers:

  • Friendly and convenient service
  • Easy access
  • Improved anticoagulation control
  • Reduced number of INR tests required to maintain good control
  • Improved patient safety
  • Reduced potential for errors in dosing

Family planning and Sexual health

A wide range of family planning options are available at the surgery including the Mirena IUS, IUD, Nexplanon insertion and removal, depot injections, and contraceptive pills. Speak to one of our nurses for more information about making an appointment for the IUS/IUD/Nexplanon clinic. Our waiting times are usually shorter than local family planning clinics.

Sexual health

If you are concerned about sexual infections contraception or pregnancy, please book to see Nurse or Dr. Any advice is completely confidential even for teenagers under the age of 16. Free condoms will be supplied. Information will not be divulged to parents without your consent.

For more information about different methods of contraceptive please visit

NHS contraception-guide

Ante Natal and Post Natal care

Antenatal care is provided predominately by Community Midwives. You will be seen on a regular basis to make sure you are well and that your pregnancy is progressing normally.

Your midwife will discuss with you the number of times you will need to be seen during your pregnancy based on your healthcare needs and your wishes. When you have decided upon a schedule of visits you will need to book these appointments at the surgery. If, however you need a hospital appointment, your midwife will book this for you. If you think you have missed an appointment or have concerns, please contact your midwife or the reception at the surgery.

Baby Immunisations

The practice offers full baby immunisations, please remember to bring your immunisation record book with you to your appointment.

If you do not want your child to receive any of their immunisations it is important that you inform the practice either at reception or when you next see the GP or Nurse

Travel Vaccinations

Before attending for travel vaccination, patients need to complete a travel assessment form and return it to the practice so that we can advise you on what vaccinations you will need.

Anti malaria prophylaxis and Hepatitis B Vaccination for travel are not covered under the NHS, please enquire at our reception about the fee for a prescription

Seasonal Influenza

Influenza Vaccination Given annually to patients over 65 or those patients who are at risk (Chronic disease such as Asthma, Diabetes, COPD, Renal illness or if you are a carer).